Protein and Ketosis: Too Much Protien

The key to the keto diet is to maintain a high amount of fat intake, a moderate amount of protein intake, and a very low carb intake.
How can protein knock you out of ketosis?
Many of us think you can never eat too much protein. However, eating more protein than your body needs can interfere with your health and fitness goals in a number of ways, including weight gain, extra body fat, stress on your kidneys,1 dehydration, and leaching of important bone minerals. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is gluconeogenesis.

What is gluconeogenesis?
Gluconeogenesis is how your body turns protein into glycogen that can be used as glucose to burn for fuel.

Why do I not want my body to turn “protein into glycogen that can be used as glucose to burn for fuel?”
Remember the purpose of the keto diet is to get the body break down fatty acids, which then produces ketones for energy—the process known as ketosis. If the body uses protein for fuel, it is not in ketosis. This stalls any long-term progress from the keto diet and you won’t reap the benefits that come from using ketone bodies for energy, burning fat, and reducing your body’s reliance on carbs for fuel.

Carbohydrates and/or protein can provide oxaloacetate to the liver. Thus, carbohydrates and/or protein can prevent ketone production or knock you out of ketosis. Carbohydrates also elevate insulin, which blocks the release of body fat and reduces the number of fatty acids making their way to the liver for conversion into ketones. A ketogenic diet, then, is one that limits carbohydrate and, to a lesser extent, protein.

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What conditions promote ketosis?

Where does ketosis come in?
If our bodies have more acetyl-CoA than oxaloacetate, the liver will transform the surplus acetyl-CoA into ketone bodies. Our bodies can use these ketone bodies can be used as an energy source.

Carbohydrates and/or protein can provide oxaloacetate to the liver. Thus, carbohydrates and/or protein can prevent ketone production or knock you out of ketosis. Carbohydrates also elevate insulin, which blocks the release of body fat and reduces the amount of fatty acids making their way to the liver for conversion into ketones. A ketogenic diet, then, is one that limits carbohydrate and, to a lesser extent, protein.